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Topic: Culture

Voting on the Clock: How Flexible are Workplaces?

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With November right around the corner, voting in this year’s elections is top of mind for many. But for some employees, being able to fit the voting process into their Tuesday workday can be challenging.

O.C. Tanner recently asked 1,000+ workers across the country about their organisation’s rules around voting during standard office hours (M-F, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.). Of those surveyed, 62 percent said their company allows them the flexibility to leave the office during the workday to vote. However, only 53 percent of hourly employees were given flexibility to vote during the day, as compared to 69 percent of salaried employees. And beyond just providing flexibility, only one in three respondents (34 percent) noted that their company gives its employees actual time off (e.g., two hours paid time off) to vote.

For those employees who are given workplace flexibility for voting, there appears to be positive correlations between their engagement and wellbeing levels, including:

72 percent say their job allows them to balance their work and personal life, as opposed to only 56 percent of respondents who are not allowed flexibility during the workday to vote

71 percent say they support the values for which their organisation stands, as opposed to only 55 percent of respondents who are not allowed flexibility during the workday to vote

65 percent say they would recommend their organisation to a friend as a good place to work, as opposed to 47 percent of respondents who are not allowed flexibility during the workday to vote

69 percent are proud to tell others that they work for their organisation, as opposed to only 51 percent of respondents who are not allowed flexibility during the workday to vote

69 percent have a strong desire to be working for their current employer in a year from now, as opposed to only 48 percent of respondents who are not allowed flexibility during the workday to vote

As the data suggests, employees at companies that allow them flexibility during the workday to vote appear to experience higher workplace engagement and wellbeing. Workplace leaders should recognize the opportunity to accommodate employees as they complete their civic duty, while also understanding how it can pay off for the company in the long run.


 

ABOUT THE RESEARCH

O.C. Tanner conducts a monthly culture tracker to continuously validate their ongoing Talent Magnet’s research and track changes in workplace culture. They balance the sample to reflect the U.S. workforce (respondents are U.S.-based). The culture tracker also contains a rotating section at the end to collect data on interesting and timely subjects, such as voting. For this particular cycle, they collected data in September 2018, obtaining 1,064 responses.

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